Tag Archives | acute

Ice application and its use in sport – by Peter Thain

Occasionally you chat to someone and think, “my word this person knows their stuff!” This was definitely the case when chatting to researcher and sports therapist Peter Thain. I’ve never known anyone who knows so much about ice! So I was delighted when he agreed to do a guest blog for us on the topic […]

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Managing acute calf tears

Written by Tom Goom, senior Physio at The Physio Rooms Brighton. Follow Tom on Twitter. Calf pain in runners is quite common and can become a persistent nuisance. Fortunately it usually responds well to treatment and there are a lot of simple exercises you can do to help it recover. This is the first of […]

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Back pain and running – acute management advice

Today's blog is the start of a series on lower back pain (LBP). It's a complex area and so needs to be looked at over several blogs instead of one monster blog! The first question with a back problem should be should I seek medical advice? The aim of this article is to help you […]

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Acute injury management – do no HARM?

It seems medical folk love a good acronym! We’ve had 3 already in managing acute injury. First we had RICE, then PRICE and then POLICE. I wonder if they just think up the word then fit the advice into it!? What’s next Mobilisation Avoid NSAIDs Load Optimally Vertically Elevate? I can see it now on […]

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Sub-acute injury management

A lot of guidelines exist for management of acute injury. Most people will have heard of RICE, PRICE or, more recently POLICE. But what do you do when the acute phase ends? Continue with the ice? Stick your running shoes on and hit the road? This blog is to help you manage the next part, […]

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Acute injury management – Woop Woop! That’s the sound of da POLICE!?

When it comes to managing an acute injury many of you will have heard of RICE and some will have seen it progress to PRICE. For those that missed it, it stands for Protect Rest Ice Compression Elevation. But a recent study by Bleakley, Glasgow and MacAuley 2012 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine […]

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